National Organization of Mothers of Twins Clubs. National Organization of Mothers of Twins Clubs

 

book_cover

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
tc-fetal-center_logo_for_cross_link_on_website_11-11_smaller_icon
        cultural_au_pair_-_fa_2012_reduced

 

 

 

 

Home arrow Multiple Information arrow Incidence of Multiple Births
Multiple Births Statistics Print

 

Multiple Births in United States in 2011:

 - Number of live singleton births:

 

3,816,904

 - Number of live multiple births:

 

     136,686

 

 - Total number of births:

 

  3,953,590

 - Number of twin births:  

 

131,269

 - Number of triplet births: 

 

 5137

 - Number of quadruplet births: 

 

  239


 - Number of quintuplets and other higher order mulitples

 

  41






















-       - Overall birth rate:                                               12.7/1000 population     

 

-       -  Twin birth rate:                                                        33.2/1000 live births

 

-       -  Triplet or higher birth rate:                                   137/100,000 live births

 

-        - Fertility rate:                   63.2 births per 1000 women aged 15-44 years

 

-       -  Percent born low birth weight (<2500 grams):                                8.1%

 

-        - Percent born pre-term (<37 weeks):                                            11.73%

 

 

 

 

Births:  Highlights of the Final Data for 2011

           This is the most recent data from the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) on birth rate and associated trends in the United States..  To view the enti re report, visit:  http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr62/nvsr62_01.pdf.  The report contains detailed data on numbers and characteristics of births in 2011, birth and fertility rates, maternal demographic and health characteristics, place and attendant at birth, and infant health characteristics.

            A total of 3,953,590 live births were registered in the United States in 2011, 1 percent less than in 2010.  The general fertility rate also declined 1 percent, to 63.2 per 1000 women 15 to 44 years.  This is the lowest ever reported for the United States. The total fertility rate also declined to 2 percent.

            The birth rate for teenagers, ages 15-19, dropped 8% from the previous year, another historic low for the U.S.   Birth rates declined among women in their twenties, were unchanged for women 30-34 years, and rose for women 35 to 44 years.

            The number of births and the birth rate for unmarried women fell in 2011 for the third consecutive year. The percentage of births to unmarried women was essentially stable at 40.7 percent.

            The mean age of the mother at first birth rose again, to 25.6 years in 2011, up from 25.4 years in 2010, and 21.4 years in 1970.

            The 2011 U.S. Cesarean delivery rate was unchanged from 2010 at 32.8 percent. The Cesarean rate rose nearly 60 percent from 1996 to 2009, but declined slightly from 2009 to 2010.

            The preterm birth rate (delivery at less than 37 weeks gestation) declined for the fifth straight year, to 11.73 percent.   This is down 2 percent from 2010 and 8 percent from the 2006 peak.

            The 2011 rate of low birth weight (less than 2500 grams) was 8.1 percent, down slightly from 2010 (8.15 percent) and 2 percent lower than the 2006 high (8.26 percent).

 

Multiple Births

            The 2011 twin birth rate was 33.2 per 1000 total births, essentially unchanged from 2009 and 2010. The rate of twin births rose 76 percent from 1980 to 2009-2011.  From 1980 to 2004, increases averaged nearly 3 percent a year (peaking at more than 4 percent from 1995 to 1998).  From 2005 to 2011, however, the pace of increase slowed to ½ percent annually.  In 2011, 131,269 infants were born in twin deliveries, down 1 percent from 2010, and similar to the percent decline in the number of singleton births.

            From 1990 to 2009, the twin birth rate increased 62 percent among non-Hispanic white women (from 22.9 to 37 per 1000), 42 percent for non-Hispanic black (from 26.7 to 38), and 25 percent for Hispanic women (18 to 22.5).  Since 2009 rates have declined among non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black women, but have continued to increase among Hispanic mothers.

The triplet and higher order multiple birth rate was also essentially unchanged from 2010 at 137/100,000 but has declined 29 percent since 1998.  The triplet and HOM birth rate rose more than 400 percent from 1980 (37) to 1998 (193.5), but has since trended downward.  The 2011 number of triplet/HOM births (5417) was the lowest reported since 1995 and includes 5137 triplets, 239 quadruplets, and 41 quintuplets or higher-order multiples.

 

Numbers of twin, triplet, quadruplet, and quintuplet and other higher-order multiple births: United States, 1995-2011.

Year                Twins              Triplets           Quads             Quints/HOM

2011                131,269           5137                239                  41

2010                132,379           5153                313                  37

2009                137,379           5905                355                  80

2008                138,660           5877                345                  46

2007                138,961           5967                369                  91

2006                137,085           6540                355                  67

2005                133.122           6208                418                  68

2004                132,219           6750                439                  86

2003                128,665           7110                468                  85

2002                125,134           6898                434                  69

2001                121,246           6885                501                  85

2000                118,916           6742                506                  77

1999                114,307           6742                512                  67

1998                110,670           6919                627                  79

1997                104,137           6148                510                  79

1996                100,750           5298                560                  81

1995                96,736            4551                365                  57

1990                93,865            2830                185                  13

 

Triplet/HOM birth rates increased for each of the major race and Hispanic origin groups during most of the 1990’s, but differing trends are observed by race and Hispanic origin since 1998.  The triplet/HOM birth rate for non-Hispanic white women was 171 per 100,000 in 2011, not statistically different from 2010 (177.7) but down 35 percent since the 1998 peak.  Triplet/HOM birth rates among non-Hispanic black women rose from 97.3 to 108.9 from 2010 to 2011; the rate for this group has fluctuated, but was 25 percent higher in 2011 than in 1998.  Among Hispanic women, the 2011 rate of 78.7 was essentially the same as that for 2010; the triplet/HOM rate for this group has also fluctuated, but is essentially unchanged compared with 1998.

Since 1998, when the overall triplet/HOM birth rate peaked, age-specific triplet/HOM rates have declined by at least 25 percent for women in age groups 25 years and older.  Rates continue to be highest among older mothers, particularly those aged 45 and higher.

The increase in twin and especially triplet/HOM birth rates during the 1980’s and 1990’s have been associated with older maternal age and the expanded use of fertility-enhancing therapies, both Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART) (e.g., in-vitro fertilization), and non-ART treatments (ovulation induction medications without ART).  The recent decline in triplet/HOM birth rates has been associated with guidelines from the American Society for Reproductive Medicine intended to reduce the incidence of higher-order multiple gestation pregnancies, and also, to improvements in ART procedures, i.e., the transfer of fewer embryos per IVF cycle.  In 2009, 19 percent of all twins and 34 percent of all triplet/HOM births were estimated to have been conceived with ART.

Infants born in multi-gestation pregnancies are generally born earlier and smaller than those in singleton pregnancies and, accordingly are less likely to survive to their first birthday.  In 2011, 11 percent of twins, more than 1/3 of all triplets, and more than 2/3 of all quadruplets and higher order multiples were delivered very preterm (<32 weeks of gestation), compared with less than 2 percent of singletons.

Multiple birth occurrence ranges widely by state.  For combined years 2009-2011, twin birth rates ranged from 24.6 per 1000 in New Mexico, to 44.5 percent in New Jersey.  Twin rates were above 40 per 1000 (or more than 4 percent of all births) in Connecticut, Massachusetts, and New Jersey for this 3-year period.  State-specific triplet/HOM birth rates ranged from 55 per 100,000 in Montana, to 213.8 in New Jersey; 3 states reported triplet/HOM rates higher than 200  (0.2%) – New Jersey, Nebraska and North Dakota
 
Next >
Copyright © NOMOTC, INC. All Rights Reserved
Site created and designed by David McKinnis Consulting, LLC